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08 August 2012 @ 10:47 pm
Books Read in 2012 (mid-year)  
The year is halfway over! That means it's time for a book list:


Books Read 2012

The Thief of Time: A Novel of Discworld by Terry Pratchett (re-read, audiobook)

Coraline by Neil Gaiman (re-read, audiobook)

Reaper Man: A Novel of Discworld by Terry Pratchett (re-read, audiobook)

The Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson

Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman (re-read, audiobook)

Whose Body: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

Clouds of Witness: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England: A Handbook for Visitors to the Fourteenth Century by Ian Mortimer

Unnatural Death: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

Strong Poison: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

Five Red Herrings: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis (audiobook)

The Prisoner of Zenda by Anthony Hope (audiobook)

The Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome

Have His Carcase: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

Murder Must Advertise: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

Interesting Times: A NOvel of Discworld by Terry Pratchett

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy by John le Carre

The Nine Tailors: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read)

Gaudy Night: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Winter Rose by Patricia McKillip (re-read)

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

Busman's Honeymoon: A Lord Peter Wimsey Mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

A Spy in the House by Y.S. Lee

Lord Peter Views the Body by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

Hangman's Holiday by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

Echoes of Betrayal by Elizabeth Moon

In the Teeth of the Evidence by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

Striding Folly by Dorothy L. Sayers (re-read, audiobook)

Looking for Alaska by John Green

Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold Story of Engish by John H. McWhorter

Entwined by Heather Dixon

The False Princess by Eilis O'Neal

Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex by Mary Roach

Storm Front: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (re-read, audiobook)

Fool Moon: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (re-read, audiobook)

Grave Peril: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (re-read, audiobook)

The Protector by Madeline Hunter (re-read)

By Arrangement by Madeline Hunter (re-read)

Summer Knight: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (re-read, audiobook)

Death Masks: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (audiobook)

Blood Rites: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (audiobook)

Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day by Winifred Watson

Let's Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir by Jenny Lawson

Proven Guilty: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (audiobook)

Graceling by Kristin Cashore

The Name of the Star by Maureen Johnson

Small Favor: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (audiobook)

Divergent by Veronica Roth

Turn Coat: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (audiobook)

Fire by Kristin Cashore

Changes: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (audiobook)

Monstrous Regiment: A Novel of Discworld by Terry Pratchett (re-read)

Ghost Story: The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher (audiobook)

Making Money: A NOvel of Discworld by Terry Pratchett

Are Women Human? by Dorothy L. Sayers

Insurgent by Veronica Roth

Unseen Academicals: A Novel of Discworld by Terry Pratchett

Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley (audiobook)

Carpe Jugulum: A Novel of Discworld by Terry Pratchett (re-read, audiobook)

An Abundance of Katherines by John Green

The Know-it-All: One Man's Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World by A.J. Jacobs (audiobook)

Maskerade: A Novel of Discworld by Terry Pratchett (re-read, audiobook)

The Shadow Cats by Rae Carson (novella)
 
 
 
ramblin' girl: wrapped up in booksbarefoottomboy on August 10th, 2012 09:12 pm (UTC)
I feel like I've heard a lot about The Girl of Fire and Thorns, but now I think I'm mixing it up with Daughter of Smoke and Bone...

Either way, what did you think of it? (Fire & Thorns, but also Smoke & Bone if you've read that.)
Charis M. Ellisoncharismitaine on August 11th, 2012 05:51 am (UTC)
I haven't read Smoke & Bone, but I really enjoyed Fire & Thorns! It's not a perfect book, by any means, but it touched on a lot of things that I liked, such as:

-the heroine is fat. Not curvy or plump. Fat. And although I think the point may have been overemphasized in the beginning of the book ('okay, she's fat, we know now'), it's definitely not a book about her being fat. It's about her being a heroine. Who happens to be fat.

-she's heroic not because she is unusually athletic or agile or learns special fighting techniques (although if you've read the blurb you know that she is associated with a special religious/magical calling, but this isn't something that's actually useful to her much throughout the book, although its presence drives the plot). She accomplishes things because she's intelligent, thoughtful, and determined. As a fat, decidedly un-athletic girl, it was really nice to read a YA fantasy novel with a strong heroine who isn't a super special talented athlete or fighter.

-the book deals with religion in a solidly developed way, which I love--so many fantasy novels either have 'vague pagan religion', 'vague folk belief religion', 'religion that mostly exists so that the world can have swear words', or 'Standard Issue Pantheon*' that I find it incredibly refreshing to read something with an organized religion that is developed, integral to the book's culture, and that characters actually practice. And that isn't a weird fanatical cult and/or the bad guys. It's especially refreshing to have a monotheist religion in a fantasy novel. Fire & Thorns deals with religion in a really great way that I really appreciated, and I liked it a lot. (The only other examples that I can think of for fantasy novels that use religion well: The Deed of Paksenarrion by Elizabeth Moon, Megan Whalen Turner's books, and The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold, and none of them are monotheistic. They go above and beyond Standard Issue Pantheon, though, and include characters who actually have real faith and relationships with their gods. Religious faith is so absent from most fantasy novels, or is villainized.)

*boxed set includes (1) All-Father, (1) God of Being Noisy/Chaotic, (1) Goddess of War, (1) God/Goddess of Chance, (1) Trickster, (1) Nature Goddess/Earth Mother'

The book DOES have flaws, though--the build up is slow, the ending is rather sudden and a little unfulfilling, the narrative voice occasionally got repetitive/tedious, but I would categorize those as 'first novel flaws'. I still read it all in one sitting. I think Rae Carson has a lot of potential as an author and that her subsequent books will only improve.

SO, maybe not everyone's cuppa, not a perfect book that I can unreservedly press on everyone with the glazed look of fanaticism in my eyes, but I do think that if you like YA fantasy it's absolutely worth giving Fire & Thorn a try.
ramblin' girlbarefoottomboy on August 12th, 2012 06:44 pm (UTC)
Sounds fun, I'll keep an eye out for it!

Definitely agreed on the "religion in fantasy" thing, too, it's one of the reasons I enjoyed The Curse of Chalion so much.